Are state institutions relevant to the politics of the poor?

In the developing world, more than a third of their urban populations live in areas where the social amenities such as water, healthcare, housing and education are desperately needed. Therefore, the state institutions and their policies– whether or not supported by aid agencies and development banks – need to work harder in addressing these problems. But for many scholars, the attention does not only focus on the role of state institutions or international NGOs but the part of the poor groups themselves. This is because the traditional state-managed approaches to poverty alleviation have not fully met the demands of a vast majority of the urban population. Continue reading

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‘Everyday resistance’: Poor People’s Politics

‘Poor people’, though contribute to the vast majority of the developing world, their role in shaping the political dramas [within state] is always over-looked.  They hardly get noticed in the political spectrum. Not because they do not participate in the political exercises but their representation as ‘poor people’ is significantly underestimated in many parts of the Global South. With this in mind, James Scott introduced a theoretical concept ‘everyday resistance’ in 1985, to study how people act in their everyday lives in ways that might undermine power which is typically hidden, individual and not politically articulated. Continue reading